£13.00£28.00

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Description

Our new Graphene Espresso is an exciting one for us – a unique experimental lot from producer Neel Vohora in Tanzania. It has been sourced through direct trade via the Algrano platform, with the help of our former Head Roaster, Luiza. 

Through mixing honey, natural and washed processing techniques, Neel has developed a coffee with remarkable sweetness and complexity. Its sweet and nutty notes remind us of chewy nougat, roasted almonds and treacle. Coupled with flavours of dried fig and raisins and gentle pear-like acidity, it’s a real treat to drink.

£13.00£28.00

Clear

Producer

Neel Vohora

Cup Profile

Nougat, Black Treacle, Dry Figs

Country

Tanzania

Preparation

Experimental lot of natural/honey/washed processed coffee blended together.

Terroir

Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Ngorongoro Crater

Genetics

Bourbon, SL28, Kent

Altitude

1620 - 1880m

Cup Score

86

Sourcing

Direct trade through Algrano

Description

Our new Graphene Espresso is an exciting one for us – a unique experimental lot from producer Neel Vohora in Tanzania. It has been sourced through direct trade via the Algrano platform, with the help of our former Head Roaster, Luiza. 

Through mixing honey, natural and washed processing techniques, Neel has developed a coffee with remarkable sweetness and complexity. Its sweet and nutty notes remind us of chewy nougat, roasted almonds and treacle. Coupled with flavours of dried fig and raisins and gentle pear-like acidity, it’s a real treat to drink.

Neel Vohora and his family have been growing coffee on the slopes of their farmland at  Ngorongoro Crater for three generations. They share the land, a UNESCO world heritage site, with a whole host of wildlife, including elephants, rhinos and antelopes. Neel’s estates are Rainforest Alliance Certified and he speaks proudly of how they have adapted to live in harmony with the wildlife, as well as protecting them by providing a barrier between the animals and local poachers.

Creative solutions help them thrive and adapt to an ever-changing climate. Neel has created pathways and corridors for the animals to walk through without affecting the crops, as well as installing beehives in sensitive areas of the farmland to deter the elephants. The bees also help increase diversity amongst the crops and their honey can be sold at the local market. Neel has also experimented with re-foresting in the last few years, planting macadamia trees to help manage and re-direct rainfall. Neel is also keen to provide stable employment for his 200+ permanent workers, giving them chances to train and feel valued in their jobs. He feels strongly about his duty to “give people consistent employment and to treat them humanely.’’

 

 

 

The Tanzanian coffee market has had more than its fair share of challenges in the last few years. In 2018 the government imposed a ban on all direct export licenses, meaning that all coffee produced in the country had to be sold through the internal auction system. This caused many external investors and roasters to cease their operations in the country completely, causing gaps in trade and financial support for smallholder farms. Farmers who had the resources to buy their own coffee at auction, did this so that they could ensure traceability. Unfortunately, the upfront costs of doing this are unmanageable for smaller producers and cooperatives, creating more challenges for the little guys. In January 2019 the government relaxed the restrictions but by this point much of the private investment had been lost. Nevertheless, the market is finally beginning to bounce back. Producers like Neel remain resilient and determined to continue to produce exceptional lots of specialty grade coffee, experimenting with processing methods, and retaining a strong focus on sustainability for their people and their environment.