Description

Returning for a second year, this coffee from the village of Pha Yar Gyi Kone (‘far-yar-ji-goneh’) has proven an absolute favourite with staff and customers alike. Once again bringing it’s signature clean and fruity sweetness, this fresh crop is an absolute joy. A delicate wine-like flavour balances with blackberry jaminess and the gentle acidity of kiwi. This is followed by a lingering aftertaste of sweet and rich cocoa powder. It’s suitable for a variety of brewing methods, and if you’re anything like us you’ll be brewing this coffee every chance you get!

£14.00£32.00

Clear

Producer

Shwe Taung Thu

Cup Profile

Blackberry Jam, Kiwi, Cocoa Powder

Country

Myanmar

Preparation

Natural

Terroir

Ywangan, Southern Shan State

Genetics

Red Catuai

Altitude

1323m

Cup Score

86

Sourcing

Indochina Coffee

Description

Returning for a second year, this coffee from the village of Pha Yar Gyi Kone (‘far-yar-ji-goneh’) has proven an absolute favourite with staff and customers alike. Once again bringing it’s signature clean and fruity sweetness, this fresh crop is an absolute joy. A delicate wine-like flavour balances with blackberry jaminess and the gentle acidity of kiwi. This is followed by a lingering aftertaste of sweet and rich cocoa powder. It’s suitable for a variety of brewing methods, and if you’re anything like us you’ll be brewing this coffee every chance you get!

We are pleased to be able to continue our relationship with Indochina who source this coffee for us – Indochina has an ongoing commitment to supporting local farming communities in Myanmar, particularly important in the current political climate. Christian from Indochina recently sent us some updates on the situation in Myanmar following the recent military coup in the country

“We have been in regular contact with our Myanmar partners, who are continuing with this year’s harvest as much as they can in the circumstances… Many do not feel safe now, both in their own homes and outside, with restrictions to the internet affecting communication and access to trustworthy information. Another major concern is being unable to earn a living, making it very difficult to support their families, continue their education and pay for essential health care.

In terms of this year’s harvest, a significant impact is being felt across day to day operations, compounded by the current COVID-19 restrictions. Travel and transport limitations are affecting the delivery of cherry to processing facilities while banks and government offices continue to be closed, making everyday transactions impossible.

Despite these serious challenges, our partners are determined that they will bring in another successful crop this season. They are hopeful that their importing partners and, in turn, our roaster customers (upon whom they absolutely rely) do not turn away at this time.

Until recently the village of Pha Yar Gyi Kone, like many others in the Ywangan region of Myanmar, relied heavily on opium as their main cash crop. In 2018 the Shwe Taung Thu farmers’ co-operative was formed. Their aim is to continue the work of local and international aid organisations, who had been providing support and incentives for the many local smallholder farms to make the switch to high value specialty coffee as a source of income. The co-op is made up of representatives from the local coffee-growing communities who work together to improve agricultural practices, provide education, and invest back into their communities. Recently, this included donating some of their profits to the local school and investing in new drying tables. The rates of opium cultivation and other high-risk sources of livelihood are now decreasing in Myanmar, as the country’s economy evolves and more opportunities for legitimate income arise. The current politics in Myanmar have created a hurdle along the way, but we stand in solidarity, hopeful that resolution will be reached and peaceful democracy will win out.

If you would like to learn more about what is happening in Myanmar, Christian recommends this Al Jazeera documentary