£13.00£31.00

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Description

Since our first sip of this coffee back in Autumn 2019, we have been looking forward to getting it in stock at Ancoats. It surprised us from the get-go with its fruity brightness and high sweetness. In the cup the coffee is impressively balanced and clean, with acidity that reminds us of kiwis, dried fruit and blackberry jam, followed by a lingering aftertaste of cocoa powder. But this wasn’t the only thing that got us excited – this is a coffee that tells a story of positive social impact.

Until recently the village of Pha Yar Gyi Kone, like many others in the Ywangan region of Myanmar, relied heavily on opium as their main cash crop. In 2018 the Shwe Taung Thu farmers’ co-operative was formed. Their aim is to continue the work of local and international aid organisations, who had been providing support and incentives for the many local smallholder farms to make the switch to high value specialty coffee as a source of income. The co-op is made up of representatives from the local coffee-growing communities who work together to improve agricultural practices, provide education, and invest back into their communities. Recently, this included donating some of their profits to the local school and investing in new drying tables. The rates of opium cultivation and other high-risk sources of livelihood are now decreasing in Myanmar, as the country’s economy evolves and more opportunities for legitimate income arise.

 

£13.00£31.00

Clear

Producer

Shwe Taung Thu

Cup Profile

Blackberry Jam, Kiwi, Cocoa Powder

Country

Myanmar

Preparation

Natural

Terroir

Ywangan, Southern Shan State

Genetics

Red Catuai

Altitude

1323m

Cup Score

86

Sourcing

Indochina Coffee

Description

Since our first sip of this coffee back in Autumn 2019, we have been looking forward to getting it in stock at Ancoats. It surprised us from the get-go with its fruity brightness and high sweetness. In the cup the coffee is impressively balanced and clean, with acidity that reminds us of kiwis, dried fruit and blackberry jam, followed by a lingering aftertaste of cocoa powder. But this wasn’t the only thing that got us excited – this is a coffee that tells a story of positive social impact.

Until recently the village of Pha Yar Gyi Kone, like many others in the Ywangan region of Myanmar, relied heavily on opium as their main cash crop. In 2018 the Shwe Taung Thu farmers’ co-operative was formed. Their aim is to continue the work of local and international aid organisations, who had been providing support and incentives for the many local smallholder farms to make the switch to high value specialty coffee as a source of income. The co-op is made up of representatives from the local coffee-growing communities who work together to improve agricultural practices, provide education, and invest back into their communities. Recently, this included donating some of their profits to the local school and investing in new drying tables. The rates of opium cultivation and other high-risk sources of livelihood are now decreasing in Myanmar, as the country’s economy evolves and more opportunities for legitimate income arise.

 

Shwe Taung Thu is an association of 18 communities of coffee producers in the Ywangan area of Myanmar. Shwe Taung Thu (translates to ‘Golden Farmer’) these golden farmers came together in May 2018 to provide leadership, finance, technical assistance and market linkages for its members who had received support from USAID’s ‘Value Chains for rural development’. This project, working with partners Winrock international and the CQI aimed to support small holders to switch to high value specialty coffee from lower value commercial grade coffee, previously promoted as an alternative to opium production as well as other riskier livelihoods such as mining.

 

Each of the 18 communities has its own working group which is responsible for managing the processing of the coffee within each village. The focus is exclusively on producing dry naturals – the climate and terroir is particularly suited to this process, with very dry heat during the harvest season providing excellent conditions for drying. Also, dry naturals do not need the high-tech machinery or water that is required for washed coffees, making this processing method implementable at a community level.

 

Pha Yar Gyi Kone is a natural processed coffee named after the village in which this coffee is grown which comprises of 200 Danu households, the production of this coffee is managed by a core group of around 25 members. This group has donated some of their profits to the local school as well as invested in more drying tables. This is an exceptionally clean and bright natural processed coffee, which really reflects this community’s meticulous attention to detail and dedication to producing the best quality coffee possible.