Description

We are excited to share with you Ancoats’ first Gesha varietal, a highlight for any serious coffee drinker. Henry Gomez has worked closed with the producer of this coffee, Jose Navor Ramos. After more than six years of hard work, Jose farm near the Tatama Natural Park produced this incredible Gesha variety. It is a mouthwatering burst of tropical fruits, mango, papaya and bergamot. This is an extraordinary coffee.

£18.00

Clear

Producer

Jose Navor Ramos

Cup Profile

Mango, Papaya, Bergamot and Jasmine

Country

Colombia

Preparation

Honey

Terroir

Santuario Risaralda

Genetics

Gesha

Altitude

1700m

Cup Score

91

Sourcing

Direct Trade

Description

We are excited to share with you Ancoats’ first Gesha varietal, a highlight for any serious coffee drinker. Henry Gomez has worked closed with the producer of this coffee, Jose Navor Ramos. After more than six years of hard work, Jose farm near the Tatama Natural Park produced this incredible Gesha variety. It is a mouthwatering burst of tropical fruits, mango, papaya and bergamot. This is an extraordinary coffee.

We are excited to share with you Ancoats’ first Gesha varietal, a highlight for any serious coffee drinker. This coffee is a mouthwatering burst of tropical fruits, mango, papaya and bergamot. This is an extraordinary coffee.

Our close friend and farmer Henry Gomez has introduced to Ancoats Coffee Co their first Gesha. This coffee comes from Jose Navor Ramos, the producer, who has known Henry Gomez since 2014. Jose is responsible for the running of the farm and he is in charge of supervising all the coffee processes. The farm is called La Esperanza, which translates into English as ‘hope’ and it is only 22 kilometers away from the National Park of Tatama.

La Esperanza farms is characteristic for producing small nano-lots of coffee. Although they also produce other varieties such as Caturra and Castillo processed through traditional wash and natural dry, their most unique coffee is this Honey process Gesha. The honey process consist in the berries being fermented in open barrels for 24-hours. Then, the cherries are pulped and put in open bags and further fermented for 80-hours. The last step of the process is sun-drying the cherries between 12 to 16 days depending the weather conditions. The name of the honey process comes because the sticky mucilage of the coffee stays during the drying process. And this sticky mucilage is similar to honey.